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ABOUT THE MARKET

The Black and Forth Farmers Market is a bi-weekly outdoor marketplace that hosts all Black vendors, including Mid-Atlantic region farmers and food artisans, at the Black and Forth strip mall in Washington, DC.

Founded by Angel Gregorio of The Spice Suite and co-managed with BLK FLWR MRKT, this farmers market is hosted from April to October on the 2nd and 4th Sundays of each month at 10am to 2pm. DJs, food trucks and outdoor fitness workshops are featured at each market.

FAQs

The Black and Forth Farmers Market is a free outdoor marketplace and is hosted rain or shine

This is a family-friendly event :). No drugs or alcohol are welcomed at the Black and Forth Farmers Market

Street parking is available. The closest metro station to the Black and Forth Farmers Market is the

Rhode Island-Brentwood stop (red line)

The Spice Suite restroom is NOT a public restroom

SCHEDULE

The market is free and open to the public. For data collection, we’d love if you registered 

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MAY 26

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JULY 7

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AUG 25

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OCT 13

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JUNE 9

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JULY 21

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SEPT 8

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OCT 27

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JUNE 23

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AUG 11

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SEPT 22

THE HISTORY

While the role of the agriculture economy has grown, the share of Black farmers in the United States has declined over the last century. Today, just 1.4 percent of farmers identify as Black or mixed race compared with about 14 percent 100 years ago. These farmers represent less than 0.5 percent of total US farm sales.

The premise of this farmer’s market is that if we provide Black farmer’s and growers with space and opportunity and remove the financial barriers to entry at most local markets, we can show our community what cooperative economics looks like in action. With fresh produce as the anchor of the market and vendors featuring handmade and uniquely sourced goods as the auxiliaries, this market will serve as a staple in the community that also represents a microcosm of the community.

As an extension of this model of going back and forth with Black business owners, we are expanding from traditional pop-up shops to farmer’s markets. The mission is the same. This is a community-centric model of creating, growing and building.

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